Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #19

Photograph by George Fowler Jones of the folly at Parlington Lake, 1882

We continue from the two previous articles at the lake. It was used by Colonel Gascoigne to great effect for his military manoeuvres, the following is an extract from a sham fight programme of 1864, the wording is a verbatim transcript from the colonel’s own hand:

‘…On the arrival of the Attacking Columns at the Wood near the Lake, they will throw forward a line of Skirmishers which will carefully feel their way through the thicket, and when they observe the enemy on the Island they will open fire, which will be kept up as rapidly as possible for the purpose of keeping down the enemy fire, whilst the attacking columns are launching their boats, and crossing to the Island.Read the full article

Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #18

Photograph by George Fowler Jones, Architect, of Lakeside Cottage 1882

Last time we started our walk along the west side of the lake, taking in the rocky promontory and seeing the planted trees creating a parkland. Now nearing the end of our stroll along the raised walkway we happen upon a timber boat house sitting above a watery dock with rowing boats moored.… Read the full article

Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #17

Giant Sequoia near the former lake

Here is a surprise, Parlington used to have an ornamental lake! During the first half of the nineteenth century the Cock Beck was dammed and with the construction of an elaborate arrangement of sluices, channels and even a waterfall, slowly the Cock Beck, from near the bridge on Long Lane for around a quarter of a mile downstream the low lying ground became a lake.… Read the full article

Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #13

Entrance to the Stallion Pens!

We live in a world where most utility services are delivered by either some form of State controlled organisation or a Government mandated monopoly. The latter might well be a code for ‘Yorkshire Water’, in this locality. It was not always thus, and whilst it is fair to say that without Government stepping in, so to speak, provision of essential supplies like water and sewage might not be universally available.… Read the full article

Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #12

Oak Tree on Mini Island in willowgarth plantation
Oak Tree on Mini Island!

Everything I have written of Parlington for these pages has dealt with things which are accessible to the general public, however there are aspects of the estate whilst out of reach of the casual walker, are worthy of a mention. One such place is a cute little pond which sports a singular oak tree on a tiny island at its centre.… Read the full article

Advertiser Mag :: 2019 #11

round building
Round Building Ruin

The area through which the driveway up to the Triumphal Arch passes is parkland, and has never succumbed to the farmer’s plough. That parkland is largely free of trees away from the drive and boundaries, save for a small coppice of beech trees which surround the “Round Building”.… Read the full article

Advertiser Magazine Article (Long Version) February 2018

Triumphal Arch

Parlington? A place to some of historic significance, to others a scenic venue to enjoy a country walk. But to many a place unheard of… sorry did you say Darlington? Geographically speaking the Parlington Estate is situated between Aberford to the east, Barwick in Elmet to the west and Micklefield and Garforth to the south.… Read the full article

1916 Miner’s Death at Garforth Colliery

A recent purchase of a facsimile of a notice of compensation to the dependants of a miner, Eder Gee, killed at work in the Garforth Colliery in July 1916, adds to the compilation of data I am collecting about the collieries owned by the Gascoigne family. I have underway a major article about the mines which will be added to the history site in due course.

Remembrance Day

On Remembrance Day, it is fitting to recall here the loss of one of the Parlington Estate workers in March 1918. The details were uncovered during my Parlington Research by a fellow historian. His loss acts as a reminder of the many, so many, lost in battles, none more futile than those scythed away in the First World War.… Read the full article